Blu-ray Comedy Bundle (Simpsons the Movie / Me, Myself and Irene / Meet the Spartans) -

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The Simpsons The Simpsons had already ruled TV land for many years by the time they finally attempted to conquer the movie world as well. It was never any big secret that a Simpsons movie was in the works: Fox registered the domain name "Simpsonsmovie.com" in 1997, a full nine years before the film was finally greenlighted. When creator/producer Matt Groening’s creation finally made it to the big screen in 2007, it only turned out to be the biggest hit of the summer, raking in over $100 million gross in box-office receipts in its first week, before heading on to do over $500 million worldwide, proving that the best joke in the movie was actually played on the audience: "Why pay for something when you can see it for free?" asks Homer at the movie’s start. Naturally, all the trouble starts with him. When he adopts a pig ("Sir Oinks-A-Lot") destined for Krusty’s slaughterhouse, it triggers an environmental catastrophe, forcing the government to seal Springfield into a dome and destroy the city. While the family manages to escape and flee to Alaska, they eventually decide to return and help save the city in more-or-less classic Simpson fashion. As Homer’s joke about the audience shows, Groening and producer Al Jean are keenly aware that their franchise is first and foremost a TV show. Maybe a little too aware, as the movie fails to ever rise above anything more than an extended episode, and not even one of its best episodes at that. True, there are plenty of good jokes; the animation has been kicked up a notch to be particularly sharp and detailed; and there are some truly memorable moments such as Bart’s nude skateboard ride and the "Spider-Pig" song. But when the film finally materialized, the payoff for long years of anticipation turned out to be small as the movie failed to live up to its potential; it’s amusing but not truly funny. The Simpsons Movie leaves the impression that maybe the show’s writers and producers had already spent their best ideas on the best years of the TV show. Had it been made years earlier… well, we can only wonder what could have been. --Daniel Vancini Me, Myself and Irene In Me, Myself & Irene, Jim Carrey plays Charlie Baileygates, a cop for the best police force in the world (Rhode Island). In denial about his wife's affair, he's a nice guy who goes around trying to do the right thing but is taken advantage of every step of the way. Instead of confronting people, he takes the abuse, balls it up, and hides it in the pit of his stomach. His psyche can only take so much, though, and soon his alter-ego Hank pops out to do every libidinous thing Charlie would never do. It's a great premise for a Jim Carrey film. Unfortunately, it's not a great Jim Carrey film. Famous for the lowbrow, shock comedies like Dumb and Dumber, Kingpin, and There's Something About Mary, here the Farrelly brothers get lost in a series of lazy gags and an even lazier plot about some evil golf development and the woman, Irene (Renée Zellweger), who needs to be protected because she knows something about it. Some of the jokes hit (there's a bathroom scene that's 10 times funnier than the hair-gel gag in There's Something About Mary), but many more miss. There are some great concepts (his three sons are hip-hop geniuses) that don't go anywhere (they swear a lot). It's like the movie itself has a split personality--funny ideas trapped in a less-than-funny film. --Andy Spletzer Meet the Spartans With Meet the Spartans, the creators of Date Movie lampoon penguins, Paris Hilton, American Idol, Britney Spears, Dancing with the Stars, Stomp the Yard, Brangelina, Lindsay Lohan, product placement, Sylvester Stallone, Transformers, and pretty much every other obvious target that's emerged since they made their last flick, Epic Movie. The main subject of mockery is 300, the visual-effects laden Greek warrior movie, the relentless homoeroticism of which is not-so-subtly pointed out with a mixture of scatology, phallic humor, painted-on six-pack abs, disco songs, blows to the groin, and spitting--lots and lots and lots of spitting. There's nothing remotely clever about Meet the Spartans, and even fans of pop-culture cuisinarts like Scary Movie may feel the genre is losing its oomph, but if you're looking for a shotgun blast of lowbrow gags, this is it. Along for the ride are Sean Maguire (The Class), Kevin Sorbo (Hercules), Ken Davitian (Borat), Diedrich Bader (Napoleon Dynamite), and Carmen Electra, without whom no movie of this kind would be complete. The only person who emerges with any credibility is comedienne Nicole Parker (Mad TV), who does a pretty spot-on impression of Ellen DeGeneres. --Bret Fetzer


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Media Format: Blu-ray


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Product Title: Blu-ray Comedy Bundle (Simpsons the Movie / Me, Myself and Irene / Meet the Spartans) -

Manufacturer: Century


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